SOL- Looking With Poets’ Eyes

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SOL- January 12, 2016

Looking With Poets’ Eyes

We have just begun a three-week poetry unit and I am already amazed by my students. We looked at a few poems and after initial discussions the depth that some of them went to was impressive. We took a walk around our school this morning trying out our “poets’ eyes”. We stopped to make observations in the hallway, the community room, the grade 5 common area, the library, the wonder area, and the peace garden. We spent only a few minutes in each area and the students were using their brand new notebooks just for this purpose. After returning to class, the students chose somewhere to sit and wrote for 10 minutes. After some sharing time, we started reading Sharon Creech’s Love That Dog. We read the first two pages (probably about 50 words) and then talked about what we knew already about the characters and the story. After much discussion, I showed them the short passages we had read and we marveled at how the author could get across so much in so few words. This will lead us perfectly into an upcoming lesson about big ideas being in small packages. It was so rewarding to see the students sprawled out across the room reading poetry- reading it aloud with friends, talking about what they were thinking as they read, playing with the sound of it all.

Coming back after a lovely break it is refreshing to look at life with poets’ eyes and I look forward to the places we will go with this vision.

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5 thoughts on “SOL- Looking With Poets’ Eyes

  1. Jennifer Laffin

    We just finished reading ‘Love That Dog’ and my 4th graders loved it! I love the idea of walking around and noticing the world with a poet’s eye. Writing small is difficult, but poetry is the perfect mentor text to see how we can make this happen.

    Reply
  2. Leigh Anne

    I love reading about classrooms who read, share and learn from poetry. It seems so often that poetry takes a back seat. We can see so much when we look through the poetry lens.

    Reply

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