The Break I Need

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#sol19- April 16, 2019

I procrastinated planning my Spring Break for several reasons, but part of it was inertia. I finally decided to go to Bali, but then I had other dilemmas-for how long? Where to stay? etc.

In the end, I decided to make myself a list- I LOVE lists (and yes, I sometimes add things to a list after having done them just so I can check them off), as I tend to get things done when they are on a list.

My list revealed that my only goals were to read and get some report writing done. That made my planning easier. I decided to give myself “cushion time” on either end of my trip away, where I could get school stuff done if it did not happen while away. With that decision made I then realized that I did not need much of a location- all that I really wanted to do was read, LOTS! Five days in the forest in Ubud would be perfect- I did not need a beach or fancy. It was my chance to read in nature-ahhh!

So far I can report I have walked through the city (I decided I better do that on day one in case I did not get to it later) and finished three books. Today’s plan-nothing! I was determined to be lazy.

I ambled to breakfast and then came back to my room to read on the patio. Just before going outside I saw a monkey out the window, but was too slow to get a picture. I am enjoying the compnay of many birds, butterflies, lizards, and more. I have had several human visitors too- a man dropped off an announcement about traffic issues in town the next few days, due to an upcoming royal cremation and the election. Another man swept the pathways. A woman brought a floral arrangement to the altar outside my window. I read Stella Diaz Has Something to Say. It was recently announced as next year’s early elementary Global Read Aloud choice and I wanted to see if I could read it with next year’s class-the answer is yes! Always over ambitious I have also read the first four chapters of Mathematical Mindsets (a book I read quickly when it came out, but will now read more slowly as I am taking an online course that uses the text) and I am currently listening to Dare to Lead while sitting on my patio enjoying an afternoon rain shower.

After creating a list of break goals (after all it is now day 4 of 9 and I can feel it slipping away) I think it is time for a walk- yesterday’s sunburn has mellowed and it is late enough in the day that the sun is gentler. A leisurely stroll to town is up next… I can feel my energy returning.

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Quiet Time=Action Time

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#sol19-April 9, 2019

As the students dribble in after lunch recess an aura of peace and calm follows them. Without any discussion, they pull out what they need- and find where they want to be. Time passes too quickly and when after 15 minutes I called them back together the groan was audible.

I have discovered a little time of wonder each school day. Last year, my friend attended a Responsive Classroom workshop. Although I have used many of the ideas from Responsive Classroom for years I have never been trained, so I was eager to hear her takeaways. “I am starting Quiet Time,” she said and then she explained it. Turns out it was just what the class needed.

This year I introduced Quiet Time right at the start of the year and it has been a time the students count on.

Today looked like this:

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When I looked at it like this what I saw was action. Action is one of those educational words that has taken on new meaning. My school discusses it here. Today I saw choice and independence. Usually, electronics are not allowed, but as students are blogging, exceptions are made. Some students were writing or posting their slices (it is the slice of life challenge for students and it is optional in our class, so they have to find their own time to do this- some write during Quiet Time, others write at home and post then). Some were writing comics with a friend, finishing work, or reading. Others were creating games. Some doodling was definitely going on.

They were all fully immersed in whatever they chose and it is in these moments that I marvel at how far they have come. Earlier in the year, they had to build up their stamina to work independently for the full time and I spent a lot of time reminding students about the “quiet” part. We created a chart for Quiet Time activities (never consulted anymore- they all have too many ideas) and sometimes had to cut it short when it got too loud.

While it can sometimes feel like I do not have time for this I have found that the transition time means the rest of the afternoon is so much more productive.

We are preparing for student led conferences and I know that as students sift through their work and consider what they want to share, Quiet Time will play an active part. I know how important it is for students to have choice and this is by now a non-negotiable.

 

 

A former student slicing too.

Slicer As Learner

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#sol19- March 31, 2019

It is surprising to me that it is March 31- living in a land of perpetual summer I have blogged before about how fuzzy time passing is here. Today I finish my 5th Slice of Life Challenge, so as many others will do, I am reflecting today on lessons learned (in some cases relearned).

  1.  I am a pantser- I rarely know what I am going to slice about until I sit at the computer. A few times I drafted an entire slice only o delete it and write the one that was calling me. I often keep lists of ideas (and this year even started taking pictures of ideas), but I rarely refer back to them. What does this say about me? I always imagine I will “bank” some slices and write ahead, but alas, no- it is always after dinner drafting for me.
  2. It felt quicker this year- maybe because my class starts slicing tomorrow, maybe because I am more used to the everyday routine of writing (but why can’t I keep that up all year?).
  3. I am insatiably curious (my younger son would say I am nosy). When I prewrite (aka live life) I try to find reasons/explanations for everything, so I look and listen more carefully when I know I am going to write later. I guess that is the wisdom behind what I try to teach my third graders when I try to convince them to live like a writer.
  4. I often use “bandaids”, but I do not necessarily think that is me taking the easy way out. This year I did not use ideas I have enjoyed in the past, such as “currently”, poems, or many lists (obviously this is a list, so I did write some lists).
  5. I love learning- I read so many more slices than I comment on and I am in awe of the community here. I learn more from each slice I read. Thanks to Fran and Sally I can now even insert a slideshow in a post (wahoo!).
  6. My reading suffers when I write more- time to balance better again (without giving up on writing, now that is the goal).
  7. I live a very solitary life on the weekends- this becomes very clear in my weekend slices.
  8. I love where I live and tend to slice about the here and now- this was my first March where I did not have a week off, so only a few days were from another locale.
  9. I look forward to encouraging my third graders as they begin their challenge tomorrow. I am sure most will not continue beyond tomorrow (that is the one day I give class time), but I hope some will. I still have a few students from several years ago slicing. I am a different writing teacher because I write.
  10. Wifi matters. With power cuts over the last few weeks some times it was really hard to post and/or comment. It is harder to persist when there are wifi issues.

Now for a day off of slicing, before returning Tuesday. Thanks for being a part of the journey.

New in the Neighborhood in Search of a Slice

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#sol19- March 30, 2019

I took advantage of an unscheduled weekend to stay at home until afternoon (reading Jennifer Serravallo’s latest, Reading Conferences, which I showed great restraint in waiting until the weekend to read).

I wondered what I could slice about today and decided to take a field trip. After reading a friend’s Facebook post I knew it was time to go explore Dai Khmer, a social enterprise that has recently opened in the neighborhood with a small shop/refill station. The website listed the address as at the corner of Street 464 and Street 155- sounded simple, until I got to that corner. Of course, that is just an approximation and meant I had four ways to look. Choice one was the way I had come and I had not noticed the shop’s name which did not necessarily mean I had not passed it by, but I turned left on 464. Fail. Walking back to the corner I crossed busy 155 and looked on both sides of the street. I still did not see it, but a sign I had passed on the other side of the street caught my eye- perhaps it was the symbol for the shop I had seen earlier on Facebook? Yes!

It is starting out small, but in speaking to the woman in there today she has plans for more to come. She has sponge seeds planted out front, is growing her own aloe vera, and has local connections for some other ingredients.

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Laundry detergent, local honey, coconut oil, banana sugar, pepper, and more. 

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Soap and shampoo bars. 

This time I only bought a few things, but I will be a regular customer. I love that this is just a short walk from my apartment.

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I have been wanting a reusable wooden cutlery set- perfect for travel. 

It made sense when I got home to read the Action for Happiness message for today: “Mindful March – Day 30: Notice the joy to be found in the simple things of life. #MindfulMarch.”

It is great to see the interest in sustainable products growing here. I hope the shop will be successful

 

The Questions I Never Thought to Ask

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#sol19- March 29, 2019

When I moved to Malaysia in the summer of 2014 I looked at maybe ten apartments before choosing one. It was not until I moved in that I discovered the answer to the question I never thought to ask: “Is there hot water in the kitchen?”

Turns out it is “normal” to not have hot water access in the kitchen in many parts of the world, including Malaysia. I was grateful I was living alone, so at least I would just be sharing germs with myself if I did not manage to properly clean my dishes.

I moved to Cambodia last summer and only recently found out the question I should have been sure to ask while apartment shopping. This time the question was: “Is there a generator for the building?”

A few weeks ago in Phnom Penh, we started to have much more frequent black outs. The dry season is upon us and apparently, levels of water are so low that the turbines for the hydroelectric power can not function. Of course, water itself has been affected and outside of the city my TA has not had access to water during the day for about two months. At school, the power goes off and the students shriek or groan, but quickly the generator flips on and regular routines resume, although the wifi has been iffy.

I hear from people about missed Skype interviews, sweltering while waiting for the power to come back, the uncertainty of whether you will be missing water or electricity, and I know I am lucky. Without even asking the question I should have asked I am in an apartment that has a good generator, so although I lose power for a few seconds at a time it quickly comes back to life. Many others are not so lucky, so I try not to get impatient when the wifi fades out.

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Nestled in the back of the parking area I never really noticed these, but boy, am I glad they are here!

Walking down the road while the power is out is really a tale of two cities- many shops are dark- they are losing so much business. Some construction sites fall silent, while others call in the reserves. I heard this truck roaring outside a work area, powering it all.

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The blackouts are predictable by now, which helps a bit. The local papers publish when each substation will be cut. Today when I called to make an appointment for a massage she told me I would have to wait just over two hours, “We have no electricity, but we will at six.” When I arrived just before six, she told me the power had just been restored.

Things seem like they are going to get worse before they get better. A friend posted on Facebook that tomorrow there is supposed to be a 12-hour blackout- she was offering her air-conditioned apartment and refrigerator space for anyone who does not have a generator. The “real feel” was 40C today (104F).

As I begin apartment shopping to move neighborhoods this summer I now know one of the first questions to ask (followed by “Does this street flood?” as the rainy season approaches).

Today Was Very

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#sol19- March 28, 2019

Today was very busy- my only free period was supposed to be a meeting,  but there was no sub for the art teacher, so I took my class to art and was the sub. During lunch, I had already planned the first meeting of my slicers, so no lunch break either. Students slice in April this year and I wanted to kick it off with an informational meeting. Knowing some would love the extra time inside and others not, it was optional, of course. When a few days ago a student mentioned her sister would love to do the challenge too I opened it up to all classes grades 3-5.

In the end, there were less than 10 students there, only one from another class. We had fun nonetheless. We talked about what slices are (and are not), I shared an example from my month (Sunday’s post), shared a former student’s recent slice, and more. We talked about how hard it might be to slice every day, especially since these students are not used to blogging, the way my previous classes have been. We talked about the challenge of having a break during the month and our very busy lives. We talked about the logistics of posting when they do not have their own blogs and I offered several options, both digital and not. I also shared my recent habit if taking pictures of potential slice ideas and saving them for a day I needed ideas. We brainstormed a list of “emergency topics” and I mentioned the benefit of drafting ahead (although freely admitting I never do that).

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As recess ended, I was asked, “So, can we meet a few times a week now?”

“Thursdays, I said, “we will keep it to once a week in April.”

When other students walked back in a few other students mentioned they plan to slice too- we shall see!

It is strange to not be worrying about my own month of slicing as the students prepare to slice. I am not yet sure whether I will like this change or not. I do know I am looking forward to seeing how these slicers get in their grooves.

Teachers Teaching Teachers Stress

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#sol19- March 27, 2019

I so admire people who are comfortable presenting. That will never be me. I can teach kids, no problem, but put me in front of a group of adults, and I feel physically sick to my stomach. Back to School Night, parent workshops, and pretty much any time I speak in front of more than three adults. So imagine my quandary- I love the idea of “Teachers Teaching Teachers”, but volunteering to be one of those teachers… but somehow I force myself.

Today was our fourth (and final) session of Teachers Teaching Teachers for the year. This takes place during our regular Wednesday afternoon staff meetings and the sessions are just 10 minutes long (which really makes it easier to say yes, but harder for me to limit my scope). We have the opportunity to sign up weeks in advance and can pick our own topic.

The main problem I face is that I am no expert and I know it. I tend to choose topics that I am interested in and want to refine and would love colleagues to join me on the trail. Today I decided to focus on mining mentor texts to teach writing in small groups and conferring and I felt supported by many mentors whose work I referenced (including Stacey Shubitz, Jennifer Serravallo, Carl Anderson, several posts on the Two Writing Teachers blog, Lynne R. Dorfman and Rose Cappelli, Melissa Stewart, Rozlyn Linder, Kate Roberts, and Maggie Roberts). Thank goodness I brought them all in the room with me.

Ten minutes flew by and I am not sure anybody got what they wanted from the time together, but I could breathe again! Will I sign up next year? Time will tell!